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About Brook Taverner

The Brook Taverner story started in 1912 with Frank Brook and Walter Taverner on a boat to Calcutta. Their first business venture was selling buttons to tailors, but soon linings and then cloth were added to the range. It was cloth which propelled the business forward, and despite tricky times in between the two wars, one of the largest stock supported fabric ranges in the country was built up concentrating entirely on the menswear.

In 1967, with many traditional tailors’ shops disappearing, it was decided that a cut, make and trim service should be offered. Five years later, this led to a comprehensive ready-to-wear range being introduced. Today, Brook Taverner, based in Yorkshire, is one of the UK’s most respected names in men’s classic tailoring, and is based on three principles: quality, service and price.


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Our Best Selling Tweed

Cadgwith Jacket

A Saxony Tweed design made from 100% wool by Reid & Taylor

From £320

Inverness Suit Jacket

A Perfect Example Of Tweed At It's Finest

From £315

Yorkshire Jacket

A Tremendous Tweed Design By The Brilliant Moons Of Yorkshire

From £270

Germany Jacket

A beautiful, classic check tweed jacket woven by Moons of Yorkshire

From £230

Ayr Jacket

Pure New Wool Scottish Saxony Tweed with a lovely check

From £320

Harris Tweed Jacket

The genuine article - the fabric is woven by hand in the Outer Hebrides

From £280

Staff Favourite

London Jacket

Our centenary jacket with a unique numbered label.

Our centenary tweed jacket has been exclusively designed for Brook Taverner by Moons of Yorkshire. Every jacket has its own unique numbered centenary label. Be a part of our heritage with this once in a lifetime opportunity.

From £270

A Brief History of Harris Tweed

For centuries the woollen cloth, that would eventually become known as Harris Tweed, has been woven by hand in the Western Isles of Scotland. Originally this handmade fabric was woven by crofters for familial use, ideal for protection against the colder climate in the North of Scotland. Surplus cloth was often traded or used as barter, eventually becoming a form of currency amongst the islanders. For example, it was not unusual for rents to be paid in blankets or lengths of cloth.

By the end of the 18th Century, the spinning of wool yarn from local raw materials was a staple industry for the crofters of the Outer Hebrides. Finished handmade cloth was exported to the Scottish mainland and traded along with other commodities produced by the Islanders, such as dry hides, goat and deer skins.

In about 1830 a London merchant received a letter from a Hawick firm, in the Scottish Borders, referring to 'tweels'; a pattern in which fabric is woven. It is believed that the word was erroneously read as 'tweed' in reference to the river Tweed that winds its way through the border towns. The cloth was advertised as 'Tweed' and the name became synonymous with the fabric.