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Steal His Style: Jay Jopling

When you’re about to drop a lot of money on a piece of art, having someone you can trust and believe in is essential. Jay Jopling has made himself that man. An art mogul, this English art dealer has been working in the art world for almost three decades. Single handedly, he’s changed the way we view art, bringing new artists like Jake and Dinos Chapman, Tracey Emin and Damien Hirst into our homes and showing us just what we’ve been missing all these years.

While extremely approachable, Jopling sets himself apart from other dealers with his immaculate fashion sense and keen eye. He owns several contemporary art emporiums, showrooms that are on the same level as museum shows.

 

Jay Jopling is a man you want to have at your next party, with his monochromatic, classic suits and his trendy glasses with black frames. Guests, as well as paparazzi, swirl around him. His frank nature and incredible energy makes him stand out from the crowd. His personality makes everyone around him feel secure and part of the fun.

Is it any wonder he made the GQ list for the 50 Best Dressed Men in Britain 2015?

 

Jay Jopling: A Personal History

Jay was born in 1963 to a Conservative politician named Michael Jopling. He grew up in Yorkshire, where he studied at Eton and the University of Edinburgh. His first job came while he was at University; he sold fire extinguishers door to door. It was during this time that he made a trip to Manhattan, New York as well, where he became acquaintances with several American artists. In the 1980s, he met Damien Hirst, an artist that had previously worked with Charles Saatchi. Under Jopling’s supervision, Hirst became more ambitious in his art. Jay moved to London in 1984 after earning his MA and began working with several new and up-and-coming young artists.

In 1999, Jopling married Sam Taylor-Wood. He has two daughters, Angelica and Jessie Phoenix.

 

Jay Jopling: A Career

The first big event in Jay Jopling’s career was in 1993, when he opened his gallery “White Cube” in London’s West End. The gallery was surrounded by bookshops, antique dealers and older galleries, making it an ideal location for the new exhibitions. This first White Cube exhibited both British and international talent and has since done a variety of solo shows.

In 2000, Jopling opened up his second White Cub in London’s East End. This gallery space was larger and included several international artists. A third White Cube on Duke Street, St. James was opened in 2006. This gallery showed off the works of international artists like Jeff Wall and Robert Irwin. Another White Cube gallery opened six years later, boasting three exhibition areas, an auditorium, a bookshop and warehousing. The first gallery outside the UK opened in Hong Kong in 2012.

 

Jay Jopling: Steal His Style

Jay Jopling is known for a lot of things, from his frank and funny nature to his artistic eye. However, he’s also become quite a style icon. There’s a lot you can learn from this man when it comes to fashion and personal style. Here are just a few of the things we’ve learned.

 

  • Mix Contemporary and Classic- Jay mimics his artists when it comes to his own personal style. He stands out and appears contemporary, but the suits and tailoring options he chooses are timeless and classic as well. This is the perfect mixture for any attire you opt for: a blend of the two. Classic men’s suits stay in style year after year, while trends come and go. That doesn’t necessarily mean you can’t incorporate a few of those trends into your next ensemble, however. Just don’t overdo it.

 

  • Care for What You Love- Jopling has a reputation for standing behind each artist he works with and taking care of them every step of the way. The same should be done with your clothing. Whether you’re wearing a men’s tweed jacket, a button down shirt or a pair of denim jeans, taking care of your clothing is essential and will help it last for years. Use wooden hangers, visit the dry cleaner when needed and break out the iron to get rid of those wrinkles. Your clothes will thank you.

 

  • Know Where You’re At- Jopling is photographed at hit parties and gorgeous gallery openings constantly, and he looks smooth and suave each time. How’s he do it? He always thinks about where he’s going. Art exhibitions and gallery openings have strict dress codes, so you’ll likely never see him wearing anything but well-fitted men’s suits at these events. Take this into consideration whenever you dress. A semi-casual event may call for chinos and a tweed jacket, but a black tie gathering requires much more formal attire.

 

  • Go Monochrome- While a few splashes of colour are nothing to be afraid of, Jopling completes many of his looks with just one. This monochromatic style screams sophistication and art. Try it yourself when it comes to your men’s suits or even more casual attire. You can use the same shade of one colour for your entire ensemble, though this is difficult in some cases. A better option is to use the same colour, but mix together a few different shades of that colour into your attire.

 

  • Find Something That Sets You Apart- For Jopling, it’s his signature black-rimmed glasses. These glasses are iconic of the art mogul, and something you never see him leave the house without. While you may not need glasses, there are many other things you can use to set yourself apart from the crowd, even if only on occasion or with certain outfits, like a bold tie or a classic pocket kerchief in a brilliant pattern.

 

  • Don’t Forget Grooming- Looking good in men’s suits or men’s tweed jackets requires more than the right colours and tailoring. You also need to consider the way you look elsewhere. Keep your hair, including facial hair, in check and shower regularly. Your clean look (and smell) will make you more approachable to others and will help you create relationships that last.

 

Love Jay Jopling’s look? Use these tips to adjust your wardrobe and style to dress more like him.

By Brook Taverner 8 August 2016