Brook Taverner Stratford-Upon-Avon

Brook Taverner Stratford-upon-Avon, 13 Bridge Street, CV37 6AB

Opening Hours

Monday - Saturday 9am-5:30pm

Sunday 10am-4pm

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How to Find Us

Brook Taverner Stratford-upon-Avon can be found at 13 Bridge Street, in the unit previously occupied by Jaeger, neighboured by Crew Clothing and Jigsaw. There is ample parking available directly outside our store on the main high street, and the Bridgeway multi-storey car park is less than a 5-minute walk away. 

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Telephone Number 

 01789 290900

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How to Get to Stratford-upon-Avon

Stratford-upon-Avon is one of the most easily accessed towns in the country, whether it be by road, train, or air. Britain's main motorways - the M1, M6 and M5 - all converge nearby, while the M4, M40 and M50 also provide excellent access. to the south of the region. Access from North Wales, the North East and North West of England is via the M56, M62 and M6.

To access via the M40, take exit 15 and enter Stratford-upon-Avon via the A46, or alternatively, access can be found via the A3400 from both the south (Oxford) and the north (Birmingham).

By rail, Stratford-upon-Avon has direct lines from Birmingham Moor Street that leave approximately every half an hour, and from London, trains leave Marylebone station every 40 minutes and is accessible with a change at nearby Dorridge. 

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Store Manager

Rachel Tyers - Manager since 2021

 

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Things to Do Nearby 

  • Shakespeare Centre
  • Anne Hathaway's Cottage
  • Stratford Butterfly Farm
  • Hall's Croft
  • Holy Trinity Church
  • Charlecote Park (National Trust)
  • Mary Arden's Farm
  • Nash's House
  • Shakespeare's Near Place
  • Shakespeare's Schoolroom & Guildhall
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History of Stratford-upon-Avon

The original settlement of Stratford-upon-Avon can be traced back to the 7th century invasion of what would later become Warwickshire by the Anglo-Saxons. The land was owned by the church of Worcester where it remained a village until the late 12th century, specifically 1196, when it received a royal charter from King Richard I giving it the status of the market town it is today.

The town grey steadily, partly in thanks to its status as a gateway to the network of British canals. With the river Avon being made naviable in Stratford in 1639, a link the the river Severn was created. Further enhanced by the creation of the Stratford-upon-Avon canal in 1816, this increased the towns growth, as well as the later additions of major rail and road hubs. 

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